World Civilizations 10

Last updated on May 20, 2009

Month

Topics

Essential Questions

Possible Assessments

August-September

·         Disclosures

·         Pre-history and History, and Myths of Human Origin

·         Cyclical versus Linear Time, Solar and Lunar Calendars, and periods of human history: Lithic, Bronze, Iron, etc.

·         Rise of Civilization—The River Cultures

·         Classical Era: Greece and Rome

 

(Standards 1.1-3 and 2.1-5;

 Chapters 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6)

·         Why does writing develop in the River Civilizations, and why is writing considered a key demarcation between Pre-history and History?

·         Using River Cultures and Greece and Rome as data, why do historians say that “Geography is history”?

·         In Greco-Roman culture, what is the relationship between religion and philosophy?  How are these societies’ values expressed through their art and architecture?

·         Emphasizing Sparta and Athens, what political systems developed in the poleis? Given Roman imitation of the Greeks, why did the Romans use different political systems?

·         How was Hellenism spread through much of the ancient world?

·         What have we inherited politically, philosophically, and artistically from these cultures?

·         Semester Pre-Test: Departmental Standard Data Source

·         Primary Sources--The Invention of Writing

·         Broadsheet--A Day in the Life of Athens/Sparta

·         Class debate on the contributions of the Early River Civilizations

·         Culture Overlay Timeline

·         Mapping the Silk Road

·         Venn Diagram—Greek Poleis

·         Compare/Contrast Response: Roman Republic and Empire

·         Unit Tests

October

·         Byzantine Empire

·         Rise of Islam

·         Medieval Europe

 

(Standards 3.1-2 and 2.1;

 Chapters 10, 11, 13, and 14)

·         Why is the growth of towns in Europe so important to the political and economic development of Europe?

·         Examine the consequences of the conquests of Islam and the Crusades—what ideas did each culture adopt from the other?

·         Investigate key technologies like gunpowder, printing, the longbow, agricultural innovation, etc.

·         How did tragedies such as the Black Death, Hundred Years War, and the Great Schism help move Europe into a more modern era?

·         Simulation:  From Illuminated Manuscripts to the Printing Press

·         Simulation--The Crusades

·         From Romanesque to Gothic—Design a Cathedral

·         Medieval Legal Practice: The Trial by Combat of James le Gris and John de Carogne—a mock trial based on Froissart

·         Unit Tests

November

·         The Renaissance

·         The Reformation

 

     (Standards 3.2, 3.4, and 4.1;

      Chapters 17 and 22.1-3)

·         Why is The Renaissance accurately named?

·         What key events and ideas made up the Protestant Reformation and the Counter-Reformation?

·         How can The Renaissance, the Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment be seen as the beginning of the modern world?

·         Character Sketch--Martin Luther

·         Renaissance trading cards

·         Simulation--the Trial of Martin Luther

·         Art History Visual Test

·         Diagram—shift from Medieval to Renaissance Art

·         Unit Tests

December

·         The Age of Exploration

·         The Rise of Modern Nations: Case Study—The French-American Revolution

 

     (Standards 3.3-4 and 4.1-2;

      Chapters 19, 20, 21.5, 22, and 23)

·         How do political, economic, and social problems lead societies to revolt against their leaders?  How is this seen in the American and French, Revolutions?

·         Starting with the Enlightenment and working backwards, trace ideological causes for these revolutions from the cultures we have studied this semester—where do these ideas begin, how are they transmitted, and how do they evolve?

·         Using French and American Revolutions as data, assess this historical aphorism: “Too rapid cultural change is often worse than no change.”

·         Revolution Learning Centers

·         Revolution class presentations

·         French Revolution simulation

·         French Revolution/Rise of Napoleon Concept Cube

·         Unit Test

·         Semester Post-Test: Data Source

 

January

·         French-American Revolution, cont.

 

·         Semester Post-Test: Data Source

February

·         Disclosures

·         Pre-history and History, and Myths of Human Origin

·         Cyclical versus Linear Time, Solar and Lunar Calendars, and periods of human history: Lithic, Bronze, Iron, etc.

·         Rise of Civilization—The River Cultures

·         Classical Era: Greece and Rome

 

( Standards 1.1-3 and 2.1-5;

      Chapters 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6)

·         Why does writing develop in the River Civilizations, and why is writing considered a key demarcation between Pre-history and History?

·         Using River Cultures and Greece and Rome as data, why do Historians say that “Geography is history”?

·         In Greco-Roman culture, what is the relationship between religion and philosophy?

·         How are these societies’ values expressed through their art and architecture?

·         With an emphasis on Sparta and Athens, what political systems developed in the poleis? Given Roman imitation of the Greeks, why did the Romans use different political systems?

·         How was Hellenism spread through much of the ancient world?

·         What have we inherited politically, philosophically, and artistically from these cultures?

·         Semester Pre-Test: Departmental Standard Data Source

·         Primary Sources--The Invention of Writing

·         Broadsheet--A Day in the Life of Athens/Sparta

·         Class debate on the contributions of the Early River Civilizations

·         Culture Overlay Timeline

·         Mapping the Silk Road

·         Venn Diagram—Greek Poleis

·         Compare/Contrast Response: Roman Republic and Empire

·         Unit Tests

March

·         Byzantine Empire

·         Rise of Islam

·         Medieval Europe

 

(Standards 3.1-2 and 2.1;

       Chapters 10, 11, 13, and 14)

·         Why is the growth of towns in Europe so important to the political and economic development of Europe?

·         Examine the consequences of the conquests of Islam and the Crusades—what ideas did each culture adopt from the other?

·         Investigate key technologies like gunpowder, printing, the longbow, agricultural innovation, etc.

·         How did tragedies such as the Black Death, Hundred Years War, and the Great Schism help move Europe into a more modern era? 

·         Simulation:  From Illuminated Manuscripts to the Printing Press

·         Simulation--The Crusades

·         From Romanesque to Gothic—Design a Cathedral

·         Medieval Legal Practice: The Trial by Combat of James le Gris and John de Carogne--a mock trial based on Froissart

·         Unit Tests

April

·         The Renaissance

·         The Reformation

 

      (Standards 3.2, 3.4, and 4.1;

      Chapters 17 and 22.1-3)

·         Why is the Renaissance accurately named?

·         What key events and ideas made up the Protestant Reformation and the Counter-Reformation?

·         How can The Renaissance, the Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment be seen as the beginning of the modern world?

·         Character Sketch--Martin Luther

·         Renaissance trading cards

·         Simulation--the Trial of Martin Luther

·         Art History Visual Test

·         Diagram—shift from Medieval to Renaissance Art

·         Unit Tests

May-June

·         The Age of Exploration

·         The Rise of Modern Nations: Case Study—The French-American Revolution

 

      (Standards 3.3-4 and 4.1-2;

      Chapters 19, 20, 21.5, 22, and 23)

·         How do political, economic, and social problems lead societies to revolt against their leaders?  How is this seen in the American and French Revolutions?

·         Starting with the Enlightenment and working backwards, trace ideological causes for these revolutions from the cultures we have studied this semester—where do these ideas begin, how are they transmitted, and how do they evolve?

·         Using French and American Revolutions as data, assess this historical truism: “Too rapid cultural change is often worse than no change.”

·         Revolution Learning Centers

·         Revolution class presentations

·         French Revolution simulation

·         French Revolution/Rise of Napoleon Concept Cube

·         Venn Diagram: French and American Revolutions

·         Unit Tests

·         Semester Post-Test: Department Data Source